Graphic & Web Design Archives

Illustrator

It was some time ago that someone asked me if I knew how this beautiful geometric flower by Paulius Kairevičius was created. I remember that I gave it a try for a few minutes, but didn't succeed in exactly reproducing it. Today it caught my eye again and I thought it would be a cool idea to write a tutorial about these kind of geometric objects. Bare in mind that the creations in my article are inspired by this design on Dribbble, and that I only try to re-create this for educational purposes.
These days the easiest and most practical way to add a map to a site is using Google Maps, but for printed matter we need to draw this map. Today I'm showing you how I drew the roadmap that I used in my previous Illustration post "The power of Illustrator’s Appearance panel and Graphic Styles". Thanks to Illustrator's powerful Appearance panel, you can give a path multiple strokes and effects if you need to, and that's exactly what you need when you want to draw maps. Let's have a look…
As you might know, I like working in Illustrator. The fact that I've been using this application for so long, has a lot to do with that. You get so used to it, and over the years you get better and faster. Though, just like anyone else, I have my moments of frustrations too. For instance if something works differently as expected. Usually I'm simply not aware of certain options available to turn a feature or option on or off. Today I want to share 5 simple tips that I use a lot, or have helped me in the past.
For most of the design work for the web and for iPhone/iPad GUI design, I prefer to use Photoshop, in combination with illustrator. In case of illustrations, icons, or other vector-based work, I jump into Illustrator. Once finished, I paste my creation into my Photoshop document, either as a Smart Object or a Vector Shape layer, because flexibility means everything. Illustrator has made a great step towards web oriented design work, and a lot of things you can do in Photoshop are possible with Illustrator. Take for instance the Graphic Styles. In Photoshop you have Styles. You might think it is its counterpart, but I believe both can not be compared. Let me give you an overview of how Illustrator's Graphic Styles work and what is possible…
A while ago someone asked me on twitter how to create these kind of patterns in Photoshop or Illustrator. With the introduction of the Pattern Maker in Illustrator CS6, it's possible to create patterns in different tile types instead of just a square like before. This is also the reason why I prefer Illustrator over Photoshop for these kind of geometric pattern creations. In this tutorial I'll explain 2 of the patterns shown in the example. The 2nd looks not too difficult to create, and the 3rd one is the most complex one of the two. I tried to replicate this one, but then I honestly couldn't figure out an explainable way for a tutorial. So I decided to go for the first one (using triangular shapes), and the last one (using cubical shapes).
A while ago I posted a photo on Instagram of a water lily which sparked the idea of writing a tutorial on how to create this flower in Adobe© Illustrator. Hope you stick to the end, because this one is rather extensive…
While I was creating this infographic for Grinta! magazine, I was thinking why not turn this into a poster design for the 100th edition of the Tour of France. The idea of designing a poster on this subject had already been on my mind for a while, but this time I had a few concrete ideas & finally some time to actually create them…
Designing an infographic on a subject that sparks more than just your interest is always a fun challenge to do. This time Grinta! magazine asked me to design one about the Tour of France, and more particularly about the question that comes to mind of many cycling fans: 'What does a pro cycling team take with them to the Tour of France?'.
Since today's UI designs are in extra need of extra flexibility, certainly when it comes down to resolution, considering using Illustrator as your major tool is definitely something to look into. Like I mentioned in my previous book review I'm a slow reader and it takes a while to finish a book. I'm happy to report I finished one that I got to know via Cameron Moll. The book is called 'Design with Adobe Illustrator' by Rick Moore. This book gives you the full story of how you can use Illustrator to its full potential, and how you can save time and make your design workflow as efficient as possible.
Sometimes I wish all job requests could be like this one. Then again, I'm the last person to complain as I get to do what I love on most days. What I want to say is that some projects just give me such a joy to work on. These favorites of mine usually have an illustration part. One of them was this infographic about women and cycling for Grinta!, a Belgian magazine all about cycling. Today I'll explain the steps I took during the design process, and also share some details on how I created some of the graphs…
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