Graphic & Web Design Archives

Tutorials

Seems I have some unfinished business with my Re-turned birds illustration. There is one last thing I need to cover, and that's how I created the shadow effect on the bellies of the birds. Just in case you've missed the pervious article about the wood texture, or how to draw these birds, don't forget to check them out too. Today we'll add the finishing touch and use Illustrator's Blend tool. I'll also show you some useful tips on how you can use the Layer panel to duplicate an object in an easy way and make fast and easy selections. So let's get started…
As promised, here is a follow-up on my tutorial about using Illustrator's Pathfinder to create symmetrical birds, which was based on these fabulous "Re-turned"-birds. This time we'll give the birds their wooden texture, and we'll keep it all vector-based. We'll create 2 types of wood textures: one wood grain texture which we will apply on the darker brown, and one wood texture that has these typical curvy lines, which we'll apply on the lighter colors. Both will be turned into seamless patterns in no time, thanks to Illustrator's Pattern Maker feature.
One of my best friends, Cindy Li has recently given birth to a beautiful baby boy, Apollo, and to celebrate this I've drawn an illustration of a cute lion for her as a small gift. Since I had so much fun creating this little dude, I thought it would be perfect to talk about it here on my blog. This time I'll share some of the basic steps I usually take when drawing illustrations like these, together with a few tips & tricks I sometimes use…
Today I was thinking of writing an Illustrator tutorial on how you can create simple symmetrical objects, using mostly ellipses, straight lines and rectangles in combination with the Pathfinder options. When looking at this, I thought these "Re-turned"-birds would be ideal for this exercise. So let's get this tutorial started…
It was some time ago that someone asked me if I knew how this beautiful geometric flower by Paulius Kairevičius was created. I remember that I gave it a try for a few minutes, but didn't succeed in exactly reproducing it. Today it caught my eye again and I thought it would be a cool idea to write a tutorial about these kind of geometric objects. Bare in mind that the creations in my article are inspired by this design on Dribbble, and that I only try to re-create this for educational purposes.
These days the easiest and most practical way to add a map to a site is using Google Maps, but for printed matter we need to draw this map. Today I'm showing you how I drew the roadmap that I used in my previous Illustration post "The power of Illustrator’s Appearance panel and Graphic Styles". Thanks to Illustrator's powerful Appearance panel, you can give a path multiple strokes and effects if you need to, and that's exactly what you need when you want to draw maps. Let's have a look…
As you might know, I like working in Illustrator. The fact that I've been using this application for so long, has a lot to do with that. You get so used to it, and over the years you get better and faster. Though, just like anyone else, I have my moments of frustrations too. For instance if something works differently as expected. Usually I'm simply not aware of certain options available to turn a feature or option on or off. Today I want to share 5 simple tips that I use a lot, or have helped me in the past.
For most of the design work for the web and for iPhone/iPad GUI design, I prefer to use Photoshop, in combination with illustrator. In case of illustrations, icons, or other vector-based work, I jump into Illustrator. Once finished, I paste my creation into my Photoshop document, either as a Smart Object or a Vector Shape layer, because flexibility means everything. Illustrator has made a great step towards web oriented design work, and a lot of things you can do in Photoshop are possible with Illustrator. Take for instance the Graphic Styles. In Photoshop you have Styles. You might think it is its counterpart, but I believe both can not be compared. Let me give you an overview of how Illustrator's Graphic Styles work and what is possible…
A while ago someone asked me on twitter how to create these kind of patterns in Photoshop or Illustrator. With the introduction of the Pattern Maker in Illustrator CS6, it's possible to create patterns in different tile types instead of just a square like before. This is also the reason why I prefer Illustrator over Photoshop for these kind of geometric pattern creations. In this tutorial I'll explain 2 of the patterns shown in the example. The 2nd looks not too difficult to create, and the 3rd one is the most complex one of the two. I tried to replicate this one, but then I honestly couldn't figure out an explainable way for a tutorial. So I decided to go for the first one (using triangular shapes), and the last one (using cubical shapes).
A while ago I posted a photo on Instagram of a water lily which sparked the idea of writing a tutorial on how to create this flower in Adobe© Illustrator. Hope you stick to the end, because this one is rather extensive…
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